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Regulations

Regulations

 

Safe Drinking Water Act Framework

 

In the United States, the Safe Drinking Water Act provides an overall regulatory framework for assuring the safety of drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for the development of national drinking water regulations and the implementation of these regulations.

 

As it was last amended in 1996, the SDWA established a scientific, risk-based process for identifying, assessing and managing health risks from contaminants in drinking water. Since 1975, EPA has developed 18 major drinking water regulations addressing 91 different contaminants.

 

In 2010 EPA announced a new Drinking Water Strategy that will regulate groups of contaminants and utilize several other principles to increase coordination and collaboration among EPA and states as well as among federal statues.

 

Most states are authorized (given "primacy") to enforce EPA rules when they adopt regulations no less stringent than the federal versions.

 

 

 

AWWA's Role


The AWWA Government Affairs Office in Washington, D.C., keeps utilities and the public informed about federal regulatory developments and directions. We work hard to ensure that “voice of water” is heard in the regulatory process by participating in meetings, workgroups and advisory committees and through official letters and comments.

 

This process and all comments and recommendations are directed and overseen by the Water Utility Council. The Water Industry Technical Action Fund is often used to fill data gaps that aid in understanding contaminant issues, and AWWA’s Technical Advisory Workgroups can bring the world’s foremost experts to lend perspective and understanding to even the most arcane subjects.

 

We want EPA to understand the real-world effects of potential regulatory actions, including both health-protective benefits and implications for the cost of water service. AWWA members are proud of their many contributions to the science of drinking water protection and to sound policies that protect public health while keeping water affordable.

 

 

REGULATORY UPDATES FOR AWWA MEMBERS

 

 

For more information and up to date Regulations visit AWWA.

News

Registration is limited: Free Small Systems Training

June 28, 2018

 

FREE WORKSHOP: NYSAWWA with RCAP Solutions offers a full day of Small Water System Compliance Training in Canastota. This workshop is FREE with a $15 lunch fee. Contact Hours: 6.5 Water / 6.0 P.E. Class size is limited, so sign-up now. For an agenda and registration information, click Learn More.

 

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Water Quality Improvement Project (WQIP) Program

May 09, 2018

 

The Water Quality Improvement Project program (WQIP) funding application period is open May 1 through July 27!

 

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NY Codes, Rules and Regulations - Title: SubPart 5-1 - Public Water Supplies

February 16, 2018

 

On Thursday, February 16, 2017, the New York State Department of Health held a webinar to discuss the revisions of 10 NYCRR 5-1.  This was also published in the State Register for public comment.  If you wish to view the webinar you can do so by clicking the link below to play it:

https://meetny.webex.com/meetny/lsr.php?RCID=cf602c70c7ab409cb4829781a0fe7223 

 

Revisions to 10 NYCRR Subpart 5-1, Drinking Water Supplies (Subpart 5-1) Summary of Revisions- Subpart 5-1 is being revised to incorporate all requirements in order for the New York State Department of Health (NSDOH) can get primacy from EPA for enforcement of the rules, and to ensure that the regulations are consistent with the NYS Public Health Law. • Federal Regulations- incorporating current EPA rules – Lead and Copper Rule – Minor and Short Term Revisions only – Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2 ESWTR) – Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (Stage 2) – Variances and Exemptions • State Regulations- making regulations consistent with revised Public Health Law – Cross Connection Control – Water Supply Emergency Plans • General Revisions – Appendix 5-C and Miscellaneous Revisions to update references and correct errors. Analytical Methods will no longer be in Part 5 but are available from the NYSDOH Environmental Laboratory Approval Program (ELAP). Estimated Time Line for Adoption of Revisions to Subpart 5-1 Step in Rulemaking Process Target Date for Completion Submitted to Department of State (DOS) for publication in State Register 01/31/2017, Completed (for publication on 2/15/2017) Notice for Public Comment published in State Register 02/15/2017. Final date for submission of written comments to Department of Health (6 weeks needed for public comment period) 04/01/2017 Approval by Commissioner and Public Health & Health Planning Council 06/08/20171 Notice of Adoption to DOS 06/13/20171 (for 06/28/2017 publication) Notice of Adoption published in State Register 06/28/2017 Submission of Primacy Package for these Rules to EPA Region 2 7/28/2017 EPA Primacy Estimated December 2017 Enforcement No changes to the current enforcement protocol will be made until EPA formally grants primacy for enforcement. The field will be notified when primacy is granted and NYSDOH is responsible for enforcement. Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) Changes to Subpart 5-1 will be made in a separate regulatory and primacy package.

 

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WATER AND WASTEWATER WORKFORCE: Recruiting Approaches Helped Industry Hire Operators, but Additional

January 29, 2018

 

Water utilities need qualified employees to safely maintain the nation's drinking water and wastewater facilities, and some utilities are having difficulty hiring certified operators—key to running the plants—as well as other skilled workers. Utilities also face an upcoming wave of retiring baby boomers. Federal agencies offer utilities help addressing hiring needs.

 

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2018 Training Registration Open

January 22, 2018

 

Sessions are closing out -- Don't miss a session because you waited too late! Click onto "Learn More" for registration forms or register online. Don't forget to log-in for your member rates. Call the Section Office with any questions: 315-455-2614 ext. 2 

 

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2017 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS PILOT GRANT PROGRAM: REMOVAL OF 1,4-DIOXANE FROM DRINKING WATER

November 02, 2017

 

In 2015, the New York State Center for Clean Water Technology (CCWT) was founded at Stony Brook University and is supported through funding from the New York State (NYS) Department of Environmental Conservation, NYS Department of Health, NYS Environmental Facilities Corporation, and the Bloomberg Foundation. The CCWT’s primary mission is two-fold: (i) to develop affordable, reliable and effective innovative/alternative on-site wastewater treatment systems, and (ii) to develop and commercialize affordable, high performance water quality protection and restoration technologies that are suitable for widespread deployment. Toward this end, the Center is focusing on developing and evaluating methods to remove emerging contaminants from drinking water supplies, with an initial focus on 1,4-dioxane. This effort represents the initial phase of a State-sponsored, multi-year program to proactively address emerging contaminants in drinking water. With this Request for Proposals (RFP), the CCWT is soliciting proposals from water providers in NYS to install and test pilot-scale, advanced water treatment technologies to remove 1,4-dioxane from drinking water.

 

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Attn: Water Utilities!!

August 01, 2017

 

EWG has released their public database cataloguing contaminants in water systems for every state. These stats are extremely misleading. The NYSAWWA Water Utility Council and Public Affairs Council are here to support your utilities if you need help with any questions you receive about this database! Call us today at 315-455-2614 or email jenny@nysawwa.org

Here is a link to the report - https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/search-results.php?zip5=10001&searchtype=zip#.WYDMfITyvDC 

Report: Public Drinking Water Needs More Protection

June 26, 2017

 

Incidents of contamination in our public water supplies in recent years have reminded us that strong regulatory oversight is essential to assure the quality and safety of our water. Yet, the current federal-state regulatory structure can leave significant gaps in protections for New Yorkers.

With the President's proposed budget, which would cut the EPA budget by nearly one-third, and the EPA’s reluctance to set standards for certain contaminants with harmful health effects, states and localities have to take the lead in strengthening safeguards for public water supplies and improve our response to contamination. 

 

This week, my office released a report which recommends that State policy makers work toward meeting that challenge by: 
•    Creating a statewide response plan, with public input, to effectively address drinking water contamination incidents;
•    Creating a statewide program that would proactively monitor the health of residents exposed to drinking water contaminants;
•    Applying a more precautionary approach for contaminants that are unregulated at the federal level; and
•    Broadening the scope of review when identifying emerging contaminants.

 

The report also recommends that the State and localities fully inform the public of the potential health impacts of water contaminants. New Yorkers support their public water systems through taxes and fees, and expect clean, safe water when they turn on the tap. While both the State and federal governments have done much to ensure that result, further efforts are essential. 

 

Read the report here: http://osc.state.ny.us/reports/environmental/drinking-water-contaminants.pdf 

 

If you have questions, contact Robert Ward, Deputy Comptroller for the Office of Budget and Policy Analysis, at 518-473-4333. 

 

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American Public Works Association New York Chapter - Now Hiring

June 01, 2017

 

American Public Works Association New York Chapter - Now Hiring

Position is for the NEW YORK CHAPTER of the American Public Works Association, a not-for-profit corporation. The Chapter is an educational association and in the conduct of said business desires to have certain administrative services performed by an Administrator. 

 

Click here for the full job description. 

Legislative Update - Drinking Water Highlights from the recently passed 2018 New York State Budget

April 11, 2017

 

The $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act for drinking water, wastewater and storm water projects was a bright spot in the budget. We certainly appreciate the funding and support. It is absolutely a step in the right direction. However, with the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) projecting a $40 billion investment need over the next 20 years for drinking water infrastructure alone (not including new treatment for emerging contaminants), this type of funding must be continuous for each fiscal year and expanded. Right now the details for the funding administration are pending. The first step is to obtain legislative authorization which has been completed. The actual implementation will probably lag by 6 to 12 months.  EFC will most likely develop the application process for the bulk of the funding. We will continue to monitor the process and communicate to our members as this moves along. A complete breakdown of the clean act funding as defined in the legislation is provided in the link.

 

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NYS Governor Signed the Cybersecurity Bill on December 31, 2016

January 03, 2017

 

S7601 - SUMMARY

Provides for enhanced protection of water supplies from and emergency planning for terrorism and cyber terrorism attacks.

 

Download bill text PDF. 

 

APPROVAL MEMORANDUM ‐ No. 32 Chapter 6

 

MEMORANDUM filed with Senate Bill Number 7601, entitled: "AN ACT to amend the executive law, the public health law and the environmental conservation law, in relation to protection of water supplies"


APPROVED
Current law requires any water supplier who owns or operates a community water system that supplies drinking water to more than 3,300 people to prepare an emergency plan, including an analysis of vulnerability to terrorist attack, and to submit such emergency plan to the Department of Health. This bill would now require these water suppliers to amend their vulnerability assessments to include an analysis of potential cyber‐attacks and their impact on the water supply.

 

I fully support the intent of this bill. As drafted, however, this bill contains technical flaws that would make it extremely challenging to implement effectively. In order to ensure full compliance by water suppliers and to safeguard their vulnerability assessments, the Executive has secured a three‐way agreement with the Legislature to pass legislation in the upcoming session to address these issues. On that basis, I am signing this bill.


This bill is approved.

 

(signed) ANDREW M. CUOMO

 

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AWWA Water Utility Energy Challenge - new Great Lakes competition

December 13, 2016

 

AWWA and our partners received grant funds through the Great Lakes Protection Fund to develop and administer the WATER UTILITY ENERGY CHALLENGE (WUEC) to reduce energy related pollution emissions (focus on mercury) in water distribution systems. Our team is offering utilities two FREE tools to track emissions and optimize pumping systems. During the Trial Period (Dec 2016-Feb 2017), utilities can use the tools without obligation within their system before applying to be a competitor. We are working to recruit utilities and have them REGISTER for the Trial Period to check out the tools. The competition is scheduled for Apr 2017-Mar 2018, and we expect to have 6-8 utilities compete. First prize is $20,000 and second prize is $10,000.

 

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Technical Advisory - Laboratory Analysis of Drinking Water Samples for Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA)

September 28, 2016

 

EPA has recently learned that laboratories have identified different approaches for implementation of EPA Method 537 Rev 1.1 (“Method 537”) for analysis of PFOA.

 

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Understanding Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins

August 29, 2016

 

Take a look at this great video the Water Research Foundation made on the science behind cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins and a utility perspective on the latest in source water protection, monitoring, detection, and treatment

 

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Researchers find unsafe levels of industrial chemicals in drinking water of 6 million Americans

August 10, 2016

 

Drinking water supplies serving more than six million Americans contain unsafe levels of a widely used class of industrial chemicals linked to potentially serious health problems, according to a new study from Harvard University researchers.

The chemicals — known as polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFASs — have been used for decades in a range of industrial and commercial products, including non-stick coatings on pans, food wrappers, water-repellent clothing and firefighting foam. Long-term exposure has been linked to increased risks of kidney cancer, thyroid problems, high cholesterol and hormone disruption, among other issues.

 

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Final Regulation: Part 4 - Protection Against Legionella

July 22, 2016

 

Part 4 of the New York State Sanitary Code Protection Against Legionella, became effective on July 6, 2016, and can be viewed in full at http://www.health.ny.gov/regulations/recently_adopted/docs/protection_against_legionella.pdf (beginning on page 11). The regulations were released for public comment on April 20, 2016 and the comments and the Department’s responses can be viewed in the Assessment of Public Comment at the link above, on page 59. The permanent regulations replace the emergency regulations which have been in effect since August 17, 2015.

 

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Monroe County Water Authority Ranked Highest in Northeast for Customer Satisfaction

May 19, 2016

 

J.D. Power contucted a 2016 Water Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction Study and New York Section AWWA member, Monroe County Water Authority was ranked highest in the Northeast for Customer Satisfaction! 

 

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